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Recent weavings… These were all woven from March 2nd to March 13th (all from same warp on Mirrix Lani loom warped at 8EPI).

Tree Branches

Tree Branches

I’m calling this Tree Branches. It’s from a quick drawing I did based on a trip to Descanso Gardens I took with my daughter. I was trying out some different yarns. The background is a cotton yarn from Gist Yarns. It’s doubled here at 8EPI. And unfortunately, although I swore I would take good notes, I neglected to write down what the branches weft is - but I know it’s a knitting yarn, probably Tempo. It’s kinda lumpy bumpy but I like the textures.

Color study in Mora

Color study in Mora

This is a color study in Mora. I had just ordered all the luscious greens in one of my recent favorite yarns: Mora from Vavstuga. It’s a sample for a future weaving. Two browns thrown in. 5 strands of Mora. A goal of mine is to weave moss…

Ode to Ancient Plants

Ode to Ancient Plants

This was the first weaving from the shared warp, began on March 2nd. Very quick to weave because I only wove the branches and middle section (with my beloved soumak technique!) and embellished the rest after taking off the loom.

Mirrix shedding device meets soumak

Actually, I have 3 Mirrix looms. And I love them all. But this month I decided to add the shedding device and- wow. I thought I just really loved going over and under with my fingers (of course I do!) but when I switched to 14 and 16 EPI, It became, well, less enjoyable. And what a time saver!

Plus I discovered vertical soumak! Up until this, I had only used soumak to transition between the hem and the actual weaving. I’d struggled with getting fine lines and finer lines and thought increasing the EPI might be the ticket. But really, it all came together with vertical soumak and, then, the shedding device.

I first tried it in Root Study. It’s how I got those vertical lines for the roots. I was so excited!

Next I warped my Lani again - 14EPI - and hooked up the shedding device. Oh my, what a difference. The background could all be woven easily - and more quickly - so that I could focus on all the threads and directions of the leaves- all done in soumak.

Still working on a title for this…

Still working on a title for this…

Note: The above photo may confuse some people familiar with a Mirrix since the lever is visible on the bottom instead of the top. This is because I wound it forward and have started another piece with the remaining warp. It was photographed upside down and from the back.

My S-loom

I also have a loom I repeatedly refer to as my S-loom. Silly name, maybe, but it helps me to keep track of which loom I use. S-loom because my husband (Steve, thus- the “S”) made it for me. It’s a beautiful loom, but not as easy to get a great tension. I continue to weave on it, though, because it feels so good in my hands.

You can’t see it here, but each side serves as a rounded handle so it’s really easy to hold on to it. Isn’t it beautiful?

My “S-loom”

My “S-loom”

My weaving goals for the year

I write goals, evaluate goals, and adjust goals - all year long and have for years. This year, I’ve got some weaving goals in mind.

  • To enter at least one show before the year ends.

  • Work more with color blending, lines, and eccentric wefts.

  • Explore more yarn/sett combinations.

  • Start a series of Tree Companion weavings on the Zeuss loom. I won’t get more than one or two done, most likely, but it’s a good goal for now.

  • Weave moss.

  • To connect with other tapestry weavers. I would love to get a group of Kansas tapestry weavers together. I’m taking first steps on that already. If you’re reading this and love tapestry, beginner or advanced, please reach out and write to me or leave a comment below.

A new beginning

It’s January 12th, 2019 and I’m finally doing something I’ve been wanting to do for a long time. I’m starting a new website.

I’ve had a website for years. You can visit it at wildflowerknits.com. “Wildflower” because I live on the edge of Kansas prairie and “knits” because that’s what I’ve been doing for the past thirty years. Designing knitwear.

My area of concentration in art school was both textiles and photography. I especially loved weaving and when I broke my wrist in late 2017, I re-discovered just how much I’d missed it. My husband made me a tapestry frame loom and while taking a break from knitting, I wove my first tapestry in years.

The Pond

The Pond

It’s a little crude looking to me now, but I was so excited at the time. I’ve learned a lot. I’ve learned a lot with every weaving since. It’s my hope to write about my pitfalls (and hopefully some success stories) here.